It’s A-G Course Submission Time!

The University of California’s annual “a-g” course submission period is February 1 – September 15 and the May 31st Phase 1 deadline is fast approaching.
In order for students to accomplish their a-g requirements to be eligible for UC, high schools must submit course descriptions for approval in order for the course offering to “count”  so timely submission and approval is imperative for our students.  A-g Course Descriptions are essential to robust Programs of Study and also can be opportunities for teachers to collaborate on curriculum development and can support instructional coherence. The AG Course Management Portal has an extensive list of already approved Course Descriptions that schools can adopt and provides anytime access to:
  • Draft and submit new “a-g” course
  • Check the status of course submissions
  • Search and view “a-g” approved courses
  • Update your institution’s demographic information

Another amazing resource for a-g approved Course Descriptions is University of California Curriculum Integration (UCCI). UCCI Course Descriptions have the distinction of being “integrated” with Core Content + CTE industry themes. While these course were mainly designed to be used in College & Career Pathways, any CA high school can adopt them.

 I have had the opportunity to write approved descriptions and also to build out the approved courses into fleshed out units and have found the work so rewarding. Here is a link to some of the work I coordinated: tinyurl.com/UCCICourses2015

 

Teachers collaborating on Curriculum development is the best professional development in my view! #learningbydoing

 

 

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Practical Takeaways at Educating for Careers 2018!

Solved Problems of Practice in real time at Educating for Careers! Learned new ways to serve at risk students from Apple Valley High and also how CTE is MTSS! This is the teacher conference. Practical take aways! Looking forward to next year’s shenanigans. fullsizeoutput_2bc8

@ASKedConsulting

@askirkman

@educatingforcareers

@CCASN_UCB

Great Learning at Linked Learning Convention 2018!

I had a fantastic time at the Linked Learning Convention! So many educators from all over came together to learn about how to make the high school experience engaging for students while preparing them for college and careers through industry themed Pathways. I even got to meet an inspiring young chef who is a senior at an alternative school in Oakland who came to present at the conference about work based learning. IMG_0978

The Community Science Workshop Network was on hand to provide opportunities for participants to tinker, make, and explore their world through STEM and the Environment.

I was honored to present two sessions: Integrated Curriculum Design Studio and CCASN’s College and Career Pathways Leadership Guide.

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I hope to see folks at Educating for Careers Conference next week where I will be presenting CCASN’s College and Career Pathways Leadership Guide: New Tools to Solve Problems of Practice on Monday, March 5 at 1:15-2:30 in Room 308 of the Convention Center.

Integrated Curriculum Design as Professional Learning!

Integrated curriculum is an approach to curriculum development where multiple content areas are “integrated” into a coherent learning throughway creating an engaging, relevant program of study for students.

Learning-Tree-Colour-low-resIntegrated curriculum also fosters collaboration because interdisciplinary team’s can come together to design.

College and Career Pathways lend themselves to Integrated Curriculum design because the conditions for industry themed course work are part of a day’s work! Teachers need support to design in this way and Administrators have an opportunity to leverage Integrated Curriculum Design as Professional Learning for teachers. Teachers thrive when they learn while they build curriculum in collaborative teams!

I will be presenting an Integrated Design Studio at the Linked Learning Convention next week in Anaheim if you want to learn more.

  – 
 Orange County Ballroom 4

 

#LLCON2018

 

 

Why America Needs a Slavery Museum

http://www.theatlantic.com/video/index/402172/the-only-american-museum-about-slavery/

“If you don’t understand the source of the problem, how can you solve it?” – Ibrahima Seck, Director of Research, Whitney Plantation in Louisiana

We all need to try and visit this museum called the Whitney Plantation or at least revisit and be intimate with this part of our history regularly. John Cummings, the Whitney Plantation’s owner talks abut how we as white people need to “own” this part of our history to better understand our current reality. He discusses how building the museum opened his eyes about why, “they can’t just get over it” referring to Black Americans and draws important connections to our current reality. We forget that this just wasn’t so long ago.

He discusses how he better understands how looking up a statues of Confederate “heroes” is painful for Black Americans and how slaves need a voice, how these brave Americans who came here naked and confused built our country with their bare hands. We have not even begun to do enough to thank them for their sacrifice and acknowledge the horrors they endured at the hands of our white ancestors.

So when we have the urge to say we all know what it is like to be discriminated against, or say all lives matter, or why can’t they get over it, or why are they so mad, or we whitewash feminism becaue we are so fragile – watch this video or pick up a history book, visit the Southern Poverty Law Center‘s website or Facing History and Ourselves and reflect and think before you speak.

Black. Lives. Matter.

Rethinking Seat Time: How Work Based Learning is a Game Changer for Students

On a beautiful Spring evening I walked up to a warehouse in a light industrial section of Richmond, CA. I heard music playing and community members socializing and celebrating. Bright eyed youth dressed in formal serving wear with aprons were expertly serving hot appetizers and engaging with party goers about each choices’ ingredients

fullsizeoutput_29feand flavors. These students were finishing their final project for a program called Plant to Plate organized by West County Digs, a local non-profit that works with school gardens in West Contra Costa Unified School District. 16 High school students learned how to grow food by reclaiming an abandoned garden plot and teaming up with local chefs to expertly prepare what they grew. The event culminated in a presentation of gratitude to the parents from their teens in the form of flower bouquets inIMG_9703vases that the students had also created and a graduation ceremony where the students received a professional chef apron and a personalized trowel to commemorate there experience.

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This Plant to Plate program exemplifies what our teens need most: motivating career themed experiences. Teens naturally are curious and driven. This teen energy is amazing to behold but can also not mix well with traditional sit and get modes of content delivery. For a lot of students, this antiquated mode is ineffective and becomes frustrating for both students and their teachers. The confines of a classroom with textbooks and a sage on the stage teacher has left so many students behind. Work Based Learning (WBL) opportunities, especially those that are thematically integrated into high school course work, offer a promising shift in how students value their education. If students value their education and know in their bones that what they are experiencing will help them find a real career, they will perform.

Students experiencing success, even if small, is key to motivation. Motivation is the key to learning!

What is your district or school doing to provide more Work Based Learning opportunities for students? I’d love to hear your comments.

Here is ConnectEd’s Work Based Learning Toolkit which has great resources to plan WBL.

If you would like to donate to West County Digs so more teens can benefit from programs like Plant to Plate, navigate here: Donate to West County Digs/Earth Island

 

 

 

 

California Model Five-by-Five Placement Reports & Data for Accountability Dashboard Indicators

Five-by-Five Colored Clickable Tables!

The new CA accountability system is here! It combines five Status and Change levels creating a five-by-five grid that produces twenty-five results. The colored tables provide a way to determine the location of a school or district on the grid and is a great way to see a district at-a-glance!

Performance for state indicators is calculated based on the combination of current performance (Status) and improvement over time (Change), resulting in five color-coded performance levels for each indicator. From highest to lowest the performance levels are: Blue, Green, Yellow, Orange, and Red.

The five color-coded performance levels are calculated using percentiles to create a five-by-five colored table (giving 25 results) that combine Status and Change.

Here is an example English Learner Indicator report

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The reports are available for:

The Chronic Absenteeism Indicator is not ready for prime time yet. Stay tuned. State data on this indicator will be available in the fall.

For easy access to the reports navigate to the California Model Five-by-Five Placement Reports & Data portal.

Enter the district into the field to access the 5 X 5 Report. You can click on the interactive report to expand the view.

One of many powerful uses for this handy data view is to conduct Community Asset Mapping by indicator. Since you can see the district at-a-glance, teams can identify potential school site assets in the district for potential replication of best practices.

What else might the reports good for?